how can you avoid getting a flat tire

How Can You Avoid Getting a Flat Tire?

How Can You Avoid Getting a Flat Tire?

There is nothing that derails your day quite like a flat tire. It’s annoying, frustrating, and can be expensive to fix or replace.

But what if there was a way to avoid getting a flat tire in the first place? There is!

So if you’re wondering how can you avoid getting a flat tire, read below for a few quick tips.

Always Keep Tires Properly Inflated

People often make the mistake of ignoring their tire pressure until it’s too late. Keeping your tires properly inflated can reduce the likelihood of a flat tire.

If the pressure is too high the car may handle differently and not as smoothly. But without enough pressure, the tires wear down more quickly.

If you are unsure what the right tire pressure is, you can always check the car manual or the manufacturer’s instructions. If you are unsure of how to check your tire pressure, you can ask a mechanic or read the instructions on the handheld tire pressure tool.

And whatever you do, don’t drive on a flat tire.

Avoid Rough Roads and Hazards When Possible

It may not be possible to avoid every bumpy road and construction zone when driving. But if you have the opportunity, take an alternate route to avoid areas with hazards. Construction zones may have nails or sharp metal that can damage tires.

Potholes can damage the tires, wheels, and even the body of the car, so be careful. If you notice changes to your tires like bulging or cracking, consult an expert.

Check Your Brakes

Your car’s brakes are possibly the biggest safety concern of being a car owner. Properly functioning brakes can also impact the tires. When brakes are worn or improperly adjusted it can cause uneven wear on the tires.

You can ask about brakes performance during routine service visits or when you notice there is uneven tread on your tires.

Get Your Wheels Aligned and Tires Rotated Regularly

Getting your wheels aligned can prevent uneven tread on tires. The uneven tread is what increases your chances of getting a flat.

Similarly, you should have your tires rotated on a regular basis too. Tire rotation can prolong the life of the tires.

Both of these services can be completed during routine maintenance. The frequency of wheel alignment and tire rotation is about every 5,000 to 7,500 miles or if you notice uneven tread.

How Can You Avoid Getting a Flat Tire?

How can you avoid getting a flat tire? While you may not be able to guarantee that you won’t get a flat tire, these tips will limit your risk.

Always drive safely and pay attention to any warning lights or unusual sounds in your car.

If you do find yourself with a flat tire and in need of assistance, give us a call, and we will help you get back on the road in no time!

Car flat tire on road

Why Driving on a Flat Tire Is a Really Bad Idea

FLAT TIRE FIX

There’s a slight heart spike every time your tire pressure light turns on.

Some of us have seen that light and ignored it because we were late for work or didn’t feel like stopping for air. While sometimes it’s only a slight change in the pressure, most times we shouldn’t ignore it. You might be on the verge or already have a flat tire. It could be caused by a nail or sharp edges on curbs. Whatever happened, if you have a flat tire, get it fixed as soon as possible. If you’re asking yourself, “Why is it such a big deal to be driving on a flat tire?” keep reading.

You Could Save the Tire

Let’s say you’re driving along your route from work to home. You pass a construction site like normal, but this time, your tire pressure light turns on a few miles past the site. You may have a nail from the construction in the tire. As soon as your tire pressure light pops on, you need to pull over to a safe area. It’s okay to drive on the flattening tire for just a few moments to seek an area to stop the car in.

If you change the tire, you can save the tire and bring it into a shop the next day. They’ll most likely be able to remove the nail and patch the hole. If you had kept driving, there might have been too much damage from a flat tire to save it.  Remember, call a tire change service if you’re in an unsafe area and don’t want to change the tire alone.

You’re Damaging the Rim

Driving on a flat tire damages more than the tire. It can start to damage the rim. By grinding, bending, and warping the rims, you’ll need some major repairs. This will cost you a pretty penny to fully fix. Even worse, driving on a flat tire can mess up the alignment, brakes, and suspension. Once all of these damages start taking place, you’ll start noticing you have less control of the vehicle.  This can lead to wrecks and overall driving anxiety. You want to know your car is safe to drive. Call your local road service with any concerns!

Stop Driving on a Flat Tire

Driving on a flat tire is never a good idea. It can cause issues for you, any passengers, and the car itself. Make sure to immediately address the issue if your car’s tire pressure light pops on.

Continuing to drive on a flat tire can damage a tire that could have been patched, and it could further damage certain parts of the car. You’ll be shoveling out lots of money to repair damages that could’ve been prevented. If you do change your tire, make sure you know how to do so, and do it in a safe area.

For more road service help, make sure to check out the rest of our site. After you check out these reviews, you won’t hesitate to call.

The 5 Most Common Roadside Emergencies (and How to Prevent Them)

32 million drivers experienced car breakdowns in 2015, the most recent year we have a quality statistic. What’s interesting is the study found car breakdowns are happening more frequently every year.

That’s not surprising since cars on the road get older every year too. While it used to be uncommon for someone to drive a car older than 8 years, the average age of a car on the road is now 11.8 years old. While new cars can have problems too, the older a car gets the more likely they start developing issues.

And when those issues strike, you get caught on the side of the road. So how can you prepare for the most common roadside emergencies? Here’s how to plan.

A Flat Tire

Whether your tires are old or you hit debris in the road, a flat tire can ruin your road trip.

Always keep your car stocked with a spare, a quality jack, and a tire iron. Take the time to learn to change a tire. Or Call Us. We can help.

A Dead Battery

Battery issues are one of the most common car trouble problems. Keep jumper cables or an emergency jump kit in your car so you can jump your car anywhere. This is another car skill you should learn so you can help other drivers – or yourself!

An Overheating Engine

Your car can seem fine all winter long but your first long trip in the summer can lead to your car overheating. If your car overheats, let it cool down before trying to diagnose the problem.

Then check the coolant levels in the radiator. It’s a good idea to keeps some backup fluids like coolant or oil in your car, but water can do the trick in the pinch if the risk of freezing has passed.

Once the car is cool, and you’ve deemed everything looks in working order, start it up again and keep an eye on the heat. It’s a good idea to get your car checked by a mechanic right away.

You Get Stuck

Snow in winter or mud in spring, there’s a lot that nature can throw at your car. Make sure you always have a fully-stocked emergency kit in your car with flashlights, flares, food, blankets, and water. If you can, stock something that will give your car traction, like sticks and blankets for mud or snow, or kitty litter for icy roads.

Learn the best practices in case you get stuck on the side of the road.

You Lock Yourself Out

You’re not the first and you won’t be the last, lockouts occur all the time. The best way to avoid a lockout is to keep a spare key well hidden on your car. The second best is to have professional roadside service backing you up.

Be Prepared for the Most Common Roadside Emergencies

The most common roadside emergencies can happen to anyone, so make sure your car is ready. And if you truly want to be ready for anything, it helps to know you always have roadside emergency support.

Make sure you’re prepared for everything your car can throw at you. Make sure you have emergency road service.

4 Common Causes Of Car Breakdowns

Just under half of all car owners experience a battery failure in a single year. If your car suddenly stopped running, would you know what to do or what was wrong?

If you experience a broken down car, there are a few common culprits that you should consider first. Follow our guide for the most common car problems to know how to get back on the road again.

1. Dead Battery

The number one reason people get stuck somewhere is because of a dead battery. You’ll know your battery is dead when you try to start your car, and you hear nothing. You may also hear the starter motor as if it’s grinding down to a stop.

What’s happening is that there’s a lack of power flowing from the battery. To fix this, you need to replace your battery.

The easiest way is to call a jump start service. They can get your car running again so you can go to the nearest store, buy a battery, and replace yours. We recommend making things even easier by buying the battery directly from the jump start service and having them install it.

2. Tires

The second most common reason for a car breaking down is a flat tire. You’ll know you have a flat tire if one of your rims is sitting on the ground. You may also hear a loud pop if you drive over something sharp, and the tire pops.

Do not drive your car with a flat tire. This will bend the rim and cost you more money. Call a flat tire service to come out and replace the flat tire with your spare. Then go to your nearest tire center and buy a new tire.

3. Ran out of Fuel

If you fail to fill your gas tank, it will run out of gas. A car without fuel doesn’t run. If you suspect that you’ve run out of fuel, look at your gas gauge to confirm.

If for any reason, you run out of gas, you can call a fuel delivery service to bring you gas. This is easier than trying to push your car to the nearest gas station or lug containers of fuel back to your vehicle.

4. Alternator

The electrical components use power from the battery to run. You need to recharge the battery, so it lasts.

The alternator is what recharges the battery. It converts power from the engine to do this.

If you see flickering lights, battery warning light, or dimmed lights, then you may have a dying alternator. Once the alternator dies, you’ll need to replace it and possibly your battery to get driving again.

Get Help for Your Broken Down Car

If you find yourself stuck with a broken down car, then having an emergency service on-call can be a lifesaver. We specialize in providing emergency assistance for a variety of vehicle-related problems.

We can help you with a car battery installation, fuel delivery, flat tire, or windshield chip.

Contact our team today if you need emergency roadside service, we proudly serve Albuquerque, Phoenix, and Tucson.

How do I know I need new tires?

At Dugger’s Emergency Road Service, we can help you fix a flat tire on the side of the road. You need to know when your tires need to be replaced. The federal government doesn’t currently have any laws for tread depth, but 42 of the states, and all of Canada, do have regulations. They consider 2/32 of an inch to be the minimum legal tread depth. We used to use a penny for the depth test on your tire, but now for a better safety standard, that same test is now done with a quarter.


Consider this: Consumer Reports recommends tire replacement when tread reaches 4/32 inch/3.2 mm. And the recommendation is backed by some very compelling studies. Now before we go into the studies, you need to know that the issue is braking on wet surfaces. We tend to think of the brakes doing all the stopping, but Albuquerque vehicles also need to have effective tires to actually stop the car. When it’s wet or snowy in Albuquerque, NM, the tread of the tire is critical to the stopping power of your vehicle.

Partially worn tires – at the depth recommended by Consumer Reports – the car was still going at 45 mph/72 kph at the point where new tires brought the car to a halt. The tests were conducted with the same vehicles but with different sets of tires. The brakes were the same, so the only variable was the tires.

How can people in Albuquerque tell when their tires are at 4/32 inch/3.2 mm? Just insert an American quarter into the tread. Put it in upside down. If the tread doesn’t cover George Washington’s hairline, it’s time to replace your tires.


Now you may remember doing that with pennies. But an American penny gives you 2/32 inch/1.6 mm to Abraham Lincoln’s head. The quarter is the new standard – 4/32 inch/3.2 mm.

Tires are a big ticket item, and most people in Albuquerque, NM, want to get thousands of miles/kilometers out of them. Just remember: driving on bald tires is like playing roulette. If you lose and end up with a flat tire, call Dugger’s Emergency Road Service. Dugger’s provides tire changes and other emergency roadside assistance services.